This route crosses over Teanaway Ridge from east to west up Blue Creek, then back again via Bear Creek and Iron Creek. Includes highway, gravel road, paved road, and single track.

Maps: View our topo map (8.5’x11” portrait/landscape or 8.5”x14” portrait/landscape). Note: use ‘Print Preview’ before printing to properly scale this map to a full sheet of paper.

ironteanaway

Activity: Mountain Biking
Nearest Town: Blewett Pass
Skill Level: 2
Fitness Level: 2

Access: Park your car about 5 miles west of Blewett Pass at Road 9714.

Trip Instructions:
Bike down the highway nearly two miles to Road 9738 (elev 2800). Turn off the highway and ascend gravel Blue Creek road 2.5 miles to fork, bear right then continue 3.0 miles more to Teanaway Ridge (elev 4600). Nice view of the Stuart Range from here.

Descend west toward the Teanaway. The gravel road turns to pavement about 800 vertical feet down and eventually follows Jack Creek downward. At Teanaway River Road (8 miles from Teanaway Ridge) turn right. Twenty-Nine Pines campground is up the road.

At the end of the pavement take the right fork. The Stafford Creek turnoff is about 1 mile up the road. Bike up Stafford Creek (Road 2728 or 9703) 3.5 miles to its end (elev 3200).

Cross the bridge and bike up Bear Creek Trail 1351 3.5 miles through forest to regain Teanaway Ridge (elev 4400). The trail crosses Bear Creek several times.

The trail off the Ridge drops 800 feet in 1.8 winding miles. It can be a bit tricky in places. The trail dumps into Road 9714. Follow the road back to car at the highway.

Trip Reporter: Eric Anderson, July 2005

More Rides:  Maps and details of over 100 regional rides in our mountain biking guidebook.

Leave It Better Than You Found It: This should be every outdoor user’s goal. Pick up trash left by others, pull noxious weeds along your route, disperse old fire rings (they encourage more fires), throw branches over spur trails and spurs between switchbacks (make it harder to do the wrong thing than the right thing).

Important Disclaimer: Treat this information as recommendations, not gospel. Things change, conditions change, and those contributing these reports are volunteers–they may make mistakes, fail to give complete information, or may not know all the issues affecting a route. So forget about finger pointing: If things go wrong, you are completely responsible for yourself and your actions. If you can’t live with that, you are prohibited from using our information.

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